Are you thriving as co-leaders? Let's see where your partnership is strong, and where it can improve...
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Before we get started, what's your first name? *

 
We want to help you assess your existing partnership. We would recommend taking the survey separately, and then comparing your results.

There will be three sections, each with a few statements. Let us know how much you agree with each statement...

 
Section 1 | Do you have the time you need?

 
We have enough hours in the week to get all the important work done, even if it is not urgent. *

 
We know our customers - whether inside or outside the organization - well enough to know what they need today, and how those needs will be different a year from today. *

 
Our team would say that we are teachers, regularly role modeling key skills, and providing specific, honest, and actionable feedback to others. *

 
Every week we help our team find ways to improve our tactics and processes for delivering value to customers. *

 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "no." Definitely not. 
There aren't enough hours in the day, or days in the week. You probably feel stressed and stretched too thin. You don't see enough of your team or your customers.

 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes."
You've got things under control.

 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is, "It depends."
You have enough time in a few areas, but you're stretched in others.

 
Key take-away:

If you don't have time enough time, you have a few degrees of freedom in a partnership:

1. Adjusting your priorities. You and your partner may need to agree on the highest value tasks for each week, and reduce, eliminate, or defer the low value stuff.

2. Adjusting the division of labor. Is one person more over-loaded than the other? Re-balance the stuff that either can do. Both over-loaded? Try to do more to divide and conquer.

3. Managing expectations together. You may also try to better manage the expectations of supervisors and/or customers; you are more credible together than you would be on your own.

 
Section 2 | Are you learning as fast as you could be?

 
We see how our partnership makes each of us more effective and engaged than we would be alone. *

 
Together, we have the skills and knowledge (whether function-specific, industry-specific, leadership) needed to be successful. *

 
We know how our personalities differ, and how to make those differences productive rather than destructive. *

 
We can rely on one another to help think through difficult or important decisions, without getting deadlocked over our disagreements. *

 
We have a clear roles and responsibilities, that establish both where we should work apart and where we should work together. *

 
Every week we give one another specific, honest, and actionable feedback to improve our effectiveness. *

 
We have mastered the daily and weekly habits we need to be successful in our roles. *

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "no." Definitely not. 
You're probably spending too much time feeling either bored or overwhelmed. Not challenged, engaged, and supported by your partner.

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes."
You are helping each other learn and develop as leaders. Together, you have got the knowledge, skills and habits you need.

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends."
You're getting the challenges and the support you need to learn in some areas, some of the time.

 
Key take-away:

If you're not learning as fast as you can, you have a few degrees of freedom in a partnership:

1. Defining what good looks like. You and your partner may need to agree on clear standards for each of the high value tasks. If there's not a clear standard, it's hard to help one another improve.

2. Creating opportunities to learn and teach. You may need to adjust your division of labor so that there are more chances to work together, specifically to allow more learning and teaching. A lot of learning can happen by wrapping another task (e.g. a presentation), with a 10-minute check-in during preparation, and a 10-minute debrief to reflect on how it went.  

3. Deliberately improving the relationship. You may want to set aside a regular time to discuss what is working well and what can be improved in your relationship. Don't leave it to chance.

 
Section 3 | How long can you sustain this?

 
If one of us were to pursue another job opportunity, the team would continue to deliver. *

 
One of us can step away for a week's vacation without checking email. *

 
We can sustain this pace indefinitely without negatively impacting our family lives. *

 
We have prepared successors (one or more) to do what we do. *

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "not long enough."
It sounds like you don't have the ability to cover for one another, even temporarily.

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "long enough." 
It sounds like you've already made yourself obsolete. The sign of true leadership. Well done!

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends."
There are a few areas where you can cover for one another, and others where you cannot.  There's still a real risk that if you step away, the whole thing could come crashing down.

 
Key take-aways:

If you're not prepared to sustain and grow, you have a few degrees of freedom in a partnership:

1. Creating short-term flexibility for nights, weekends, and vacations. What skills or responsibilities create single points of dependency? If your partner cannot learn these, can anyone else on the team? 

2. Creating long-term flexibility by identifying what potential successors need to learn. You and your partner may need to agree on what skills are required in each role, what good looks like for each skill, and where potential successors stand today.

3. Tracking the transfer of knowledge. Track the transfer of each skill / practice to successors. Have you explained the purpose of the skill, broke it into parts, demonstrated each part, let them try, given them feedback? That's how you begin to prepare them.

 
You're done with all three sections. One last question before we tally your results.

What's the best advice anyone has given you as co-leaders? What's the worst advice?

Thank you for taking our survey! You should receive an email with your results shortly. 

Do you know other co-leaders who may benefit from doing so? Share the survey with the icons below, or send them the survey link directly: https://tclark.typeform.com/to/uCOnM8
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