Is co-leadership right for you? Let's find out...
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Before we get started, what's your first name? *

 
The purpose of this diagnostic is to help you assess the benefits of co-leadership in your case. 

There will be three sections, each with a few statements. Let us know how much you agree with each statement...

 
Section 1 | Do you have the time you need?

 
I have enough hours in the week to get all the important work done, even if it is not urgent. *

 
I know my customers - whether inside or outside the organization - well enough to know what they need today, and how those needs will be different a year from today. *

 
My team would say that I am a teacher, regularly role modeling key skills, and providing specific, honest, and actionable feedback to others. *

 
Every week I help my team find ways to improve our tactics and processes for delivering value to customers. *

 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "no." Definitely not. 
There aren't enough hours in the day, or days in the week. You probably feel stressed and stretched too thin. You don't see enough of your team or your customers.

A partnership would allow you to get more done.

 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes."
You've got things under control.

A partnership may not help you here.


 
Do you have the time you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is, "It depends."
You have enough time in a few areas, but you're stretched in others. 

In this case, a partner could help you where you are stretched, but not across the board.

 
Key take-away:

Solo leaders often face a choice between (a) working longer hours and (b) leaving important work undone, particularly if it's not urgent. 

The first benefit of partnership is having more time and attention to give, whether to your team or your customers.

 
Section 2 | Are you learning as fast as you could be?

 
I have the skills and knowledge required to be successful in my role (leadership skills, technical skills, functional knowledge, and/or industry knowledge). *

 
I have peers who help me see my blind spots, and think through important decisions. *

 
Every week I get specific, honest, and actionable feedback to improve my effectiveness. *

 
I have mastered the daily and weekly habits I need to be successful in my role. *

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "no." Definitely not. 
You're probably spending too much time feeling either bored or overwhelmed. Not challenged, engaged, supported.

A partner could help you. People learn best when working side by side, step by step, one day at a time.

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes."
By and large, you've got the knowledge, skills and habits you need.

A partnership may not help you here.

 
Are you learning as fast as you could be?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends."
You're getting the challenges and the support you need to learn in some areas, some of the time.

A partnership could help you in the areas where you feel you lack feedback or expertise.

 
Key take-away:

Solo leaders are often starved of feedback on their knowledge, habits and skills. This could be because the knowledge, habits and skills required have not been defined for the role. Or because they are not observed. Often both. 

The second benefit of partnership is getting smarter faster.


 
Section 3 | How long can you sustain this?

 
If I were to pursue another job opportunity, my team would continue to deliver without me. *

 
I can step away for a week's vacation without checking email. *

 
I can sustain this pace indefinitely without negatively impacting my family life. *

 
I have prepared successors (one or more) to do what I do. *

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "not long enough."
It sounds like you're indispensable. If you step away, the whole thing could come crashing down.

A partner could help you. Preparing a successor gives you the freedom to lean in, step back, or move on.

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "long enough." 
It sounds like you've already made yourself obsolete. The sign of a true leader. Well done!

 
How long can you sustain this?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends."
There are a few areas where the team can perform without you, but others where they cannot. There's a real risk that if you step away, the whole thing could come crashing down.

A partner would help to ensure that the team can endure without you.

 
Key take-aways:

Solo leaders who are effective often become indispensable. This can mean more work on nights and weekends, and an inability to step away on vacation. This dependency can even make them unavailable for promotions or further development.

The third benefit of partnership is to prevent burn-out and stagnation, instead sustaining and growing.

 
Section 4 | About you

 
Have you ever tried co-leadership in the past? *


 
What would be your biggest concern(s) about trying co-leadership? *


 
What did you find most challenging in your experience with co-leadership? *


Thank you for taking our survey! You will receive an email with your results shortly.

Are the others on your team who may have more to gain from partnership? Share the survey with the icons below, or send them the survey link directly: https://tclark.typeform.com/to/iQW9MU
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