Would your organization benefit from practicing co-leadership at scale? Let's find out...
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Before we get started, what's your first name? *

 
We want to help you assess the benefits of co-leadership for your organization. If you want to get a more robust perspective, ask another leader to assess the organization separately, and then compare notes.

There will be five sections, each with a few statements. Let us know how much you agree with each statement...

 
Section 1 | Do you have the quantity and quality of leaders you need?

 
We have the quantity and quality of leaders we need to (a) sustain our most successful operations, (b) adapt our less successful operations, and (c) grow into new offerings, channels or geographies. *

 
We do not hire outsiders into the top two levels of our organization (CXOs and direct reports of CXOs), because we create the right caliber of leaders internally. *

 
We can reliably retain our top performers, even if they could make more money elsewhere. *

 
Do you have the quantity and quality of leadership you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "no." Definitely not.
You face a hard choice between sustaining successful operations, adapting your less successful operations and growing into new areas. Many of your best leaders would walk away for more money. You are forced to fill the gaps by buying leaders on the market.

 
Do you have the quantity and quality of leadership you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes."
You've got things under control.

 
Do you have the quantity and quality of leadership you need?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is, "It depends."
You may have enough leaders to pursue one goal (e.g. sustaining successful operations), but not others (e.g. adapting unsuccessful operations or growing into new areas). 

Regardless, you are either leaving value on the table, or you are taking on risk that you will fall down if and when key leaders step away.

 
Key take-away:

If you don't have the right quantity and quality of leaders, you have a lot to gain from putting co-leadership into practice across your organization. 

Practitioners like the Mayo Clinic, Toyota, and the Marines are all famous for developing great leaders. Partnership allows two minds to sharpen one another. It frees up more time for coaching the team. It also makes it easier to rotate leaders around the organization to accelerate their development.

 
Section 2 | Do your people feel they belong to one tribe?

 
We see ourselves as one team, working together to fulfill a common purpose. *

 
We share a common culture that makes it easier for us to communicate across brands, products, functions or geographies. *

 
Every year you spend here, you make new friends, and this makes it harder to leave. *

 
Our leadership is diverse; you don’t have to fit a particular profile to succeed here. *

 
Do your people feel they belong to one tribe?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "Probably not."
 In many organizations, you can only advance if your supervisor gets promoted or leaves the organization. You can spend your whole career in one function or area or "fiefdom." As a result, you end up loyal to your area rather than the organization as a whole.

 
Do your people feel they belong to one tribe?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "yes." 
You share a common purpose, a common language, and respect for one another's potential. Many kinds of people feel that they belong to one tribe.

 
Do your people feel they belong to one tribe?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends." 
There are a few areas ways in which people feel they belong, but others are at risk.

 
Key take-away:

If your people do not feel they belong to one tribe, you have a lot to gain from practicing co-leadership at scale.

Organizations like Toyota or the Marines can readily rotate one leader off a team, while keeping the other in place. This allows them to get the best of both worlds: stability and change. Shared priorities and practices get more weight than individual personalities. Regular rotation of leaders increases the bonds and trust across different parts of the organization.

 
Section 3 | How do you match people up with the right challenges?

 
Our way of working frees up our best leaders for new opportunities every 2-3 years, rather than making them increasingly indispensable where they are. *

 
As a rule, performance reviews are based on input from multiple leaders who have closely observed your performance, not just your immediate supervisor. *

 
As leaders grow, they are systematically exposed to different parts of our organization. *

 
How do you match people up with the right challenges?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "you probably don't." 
You may have many leaders who feel their potential is neither fairly assessed nor fully tapped.

 
How do you match people up with the right challenges?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "we're on it." 
Well done!

 
How do you match people up with the right challenges?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends." 
You may have some leaders who feel their potential is fairly assessed and fully tapped, but many others who do not.

 
Key take-aways:

If you're not matching up people with the right challenges, then you have more to gain from practicing co-leadership at scale.

Practitioners of co-leadership have an easier time making their talent development both more inclusive and more meritocratic. They can challenge their leaders with new roles more easily. Leaders benefit from exposure to more role models and mentors, as well as more parts of the business.

 
Section 4 | How do you develop people on the job?

 
We have clear standards for what knowledge, skills and habits a leader needs to master to be successful here. *

 
Our leaders receive specific, honest, and actionable feedback to enhance their knowledge, skills and habits every week. *

 
We recognize and reward leaders who are great teachers. *

 
How do you develop people on the job?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it's not a priority." 
You may suffer from a situation where your leaders have their own idiosyncratic views of what good leadership looks like at their level. Or they may lack the time to observe and coach their subordinates.

 
How do you develop people on the job?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "we're on it." 
Well done!

 
How do you develop people on the job?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends." 
There are some ways in which it happens reliably, and others ways in which it doesn't.

 
Key take-aways:

If you're not developing people on the job, then you have a lot to gain from practicing co-leadership at scale.

Co-leaders have more time to give to coaching and developing their team members. And they  receive more feedback from one another.

 
Section 5 | How do you attract the best people?

 
We hire people for a career, not just a job. *

 
We can easily offer candidates an accelerated pace of development, relative to our competitors. *

 
We can easily offer candidates a path to advancement that does not require working late nights and weekends. *

 
We can easily offer candidates a path to advancement that allows for unpaid sabbaticals, as this allows us to retain them for the long term. *

 
How do you attract the best people?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it's hard to do." 
You may not be able to offer them the accelerated growth, the lifestyle and/or the flexibility that they want.

 
How do you attract the best people?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "we're on it." 
Well done!

 
How do you attract the best people?

Your results for this section suggest the answer is "it depends." 
While you have much to offer, you may not be able to offer them the accelerated growth, the lifestyle and the flexibility they want.

 
Key take-aways:

If you're not attracting the best people, then you have a lot to gain from practicing co-leadership at scale. 

Practitioners like the Mayo Clinic and Toyota are able to attract and retain much of the top talent in their industries. They can offer a qualitatively different job experience and career path - particularly for leaders - than what their competitors can.

 
Before we share your results, two questions to help us size the opportunity.

First, roughly how large (in terms of FTE) is your part of your organization?

 
And how large (again, in terms of FTE) is your whole organization, including your part of it?

Thank you for taking our survey! You should receive an email with your results shortly.

Do you want another leader's perspective on your organization? Share the survey with the icons below, or send them the survey link directly: https://tclark.typeform.com/to/VvBKEf
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